Traditional kintsugi, new pieces.

Here are some new pieces.
The 2 bowls are from about 1700-1740, Japanese Imari. The metal is silver.
The large, ceremonial sake cups are from Meiji and from a kiln in the Hikone area of Japan.

Traditional kintsugi, Meiji period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Meiji period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Meiji period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Meiji period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Meiji period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Meiji period silver repair

Traditional kintsugi, Meiji period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Meiji period silver repair

Traditional kintsugi, Meiji period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Meiji period silver repair

Traditional kintsugi, Edo period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Edo period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Edo period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Edo period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Edo period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Edo period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Edo period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Edo period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Edo period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Edo period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Edo period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Edo period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Meiji period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Meiji period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Meiji period silver repair
Traditional kintsugi, Meiji period silver repair

Traditional kintsugi, reconstruction, 3 basic steps.

This video has no audio. It is 3 short videos put together without any editing. The transitions between the videos are at 3 minutes, 12 seconds and then at 7 minutes, 19 seconds.
This is a Ming period large plate. It has a couple of areas I am working on to repair in traditional kintsugi.
One of the areas has had a fitted wood insert put in. Whoever put it in didn’t pay attention to the fluting on the outer edge of the rim. The video shows the first couple of steps of defining the edge, making a form, transition at 3 minutes, 12 seconds, and then cutting the wood insert, transition at 7 minutes, 19 seconds.

Kintsugi, more disassembling

Here are some more pieces I disassembled and one I couldn’t get apart. One of the pieces is a Ming period celadon, 45cm. diameter plate with an interesting wood repair piece. The piece I couldn’t get apart is the Oribe suribachi. I tried twice applying heat to it for a total of 30 minutes but I guess the walls are so thick that the epoxy doesn’t weaken easily.

Kintsugi, Ming period celadon 45 cm plate
Kintsugi, Ming period celadon 45 cm plate
Kintsugi, Ming period celadon 45 cm plate
Kintsugi, Ming period celadon 45 cm plate
Kintsugi, Ming period celadon 45 cm plate, close-up of wood insert.
Kintsugi, Ming period celadon 45 cm plate, close-up of wood insert.
Kintsugi, Ming period celadon 45 cm plate, close-up of wood insert.
Kintsugi, Ming period celadon 45 cm plate, close-up of wood insert.
Kintsugi, kogo before disassembly
Kintsugi, kogo before disassembly
Kintsugi, kogo before disassembly
Kintsugi, kogo before disassembly
Kintsugi, kogo before disassembly
Kintsugi, kogo before disassembly
Kintsugi, kogo before disassembly
Kintsugi, kogo before disassembly
Kintsugi, Ming period celadon 45 cm plate, close-up of partial kintsugi repair.
Kintsugi, Ming period celadon 45 cm plate, close-up of partial kintsugi repair.
Kintsugi, kogo after disassembly
Kintsugi, kogo after disassembly
Kintsugi, kogo after disassembly
Kintsugi, kogo after disassembly
Kintsugi, Oribe suribachi before disassembly
Kintsugi, Oribe suribachi before disassembly
Kintsugi, Oribe suribachi before disassembly
Kintsugi, Oribe suribachi before disassembly
Kintsugi, Oribe suribachi before disassembly.
Kintsugi, Oribe suribachi before disassembly.